logo  

Pot Styles & Characteristics

 

   Pot Styles

oval         Cascades  
Ovals   Rounds   Rectangles   Bowed-walled Rectangles   Cascades   Slabs
          Tea Bowls
Suiban   Kusamono and Tile   Ikebana   Inset Planters   Hedge Row Planters   Tea Ware

 Help With Ordering

 So that we can communicate about the various design elements of a custom container, I’ve broken things down to three key main components:

  These characteristics can be common to all thrown pots no matter the shape i.e oval, rectangular, round, cascade etc.

 Wall profile - the outside edge shape or contour of a container.
 There are three general configurations:

  • Straight - where the major percentage of the wall elevation is vertical
  • Concave - the wall is hollowed or curved, rounded inward
  • Convex - the wall is bulged or curved, rounded outward

 Actual container profiles are often subtle variations of the above general configurations.


   Straight Wall Profiles

OB48   OB54   OB58   OB72.2   OB83   OB95
                     
OB96   OB97  

The straight portion of the wall can slant outward. It can be perpendicular to the base or slant toward the center of the pot. An outward slant has practical characteristics. It allows for easier removal of the tree mass for repotting as there are no interior undercuts. An outward slant is also more informal and feminine. A perpendicular wall also allows for ease in repotting but is more formal and masculine. The slant in an inward slanting wall should be minimal for ease in repotting. An inward slanting (diagonal) wall is more informal than a straight or vertical wall.

The direction of the vertical profile of the wall of a container can be a major element of design in the overall composition and presentation of a tree. The shape of a container can complement (contrast) the characteristics of a tree. The shape of a container can reinforce existing qualities in the tree by harmonizing (similarity - using similar qualities) by repeating like characteristics.

                    top

   Concave Wall Profiles

OB60.2   OB66.2   OB68.2   OB69.1   OB91.2   OB91
                     
OB98   OB99   OB100   OB39SOLD  

A curved wall adds an informal, feminine quality to a container. The more pronounced the curve the the more feminine the pot.

The shape of a container can complement (contrast) the characteristics of a tree or reinforce existing qualities in the tree by harmonizing (similarity) and including like characteristics.

                    top

   Convex Wall Profiles

OB53   OB78   OB80   OB84   OB86   OB87
                     
OB89   OB90   OB94.1   RB333   RB354    
                     

   Compound Curved Wall Profiles

ConvexConcave   DoubleConvex   DoubleCurve  

More complex or active profiles can provide contrast to a tree that is sparce and minimal making a more dynamic composition.

The opposite is also true. A complex pot can de-emphasize the activity in more dynamic tree.


   Lip Profiles

     

Lip - the upper rim of the container, the termination of the wall profile shape
The uppermost edge of the container can exhibit several design characteristics.

Basic Lip  -the lip is the simple termination of the wall profile shape with no change in direction or decorative emphasis.  The edge could be finished as rounded, flattened or beveled.

Complex or more elaborate lips turn outward, inward or both.  The edge can be emphasized with compression and thickened, rounded over or squared off or beveled. Further emphasis of the lip can be made with a slight indent below as a decorative effect.

Basic Lip   Outward turn to lip   Complex Lip    

   Foot Profiles

  Simple Foot  -the most basic style of foot is just the extension of the wall profile without interruption to the ground.  The shape and extension of this foot is revealed primarily through the negative cutout spaces between.     Inset Foot  -the foot emerges from a small distance inside the end of the wall profile.  An inset foot de-emphasizes itself and tends to visually lift and “float” the container and lighten its appearance.     Flared Foot  - the foot splays outward of the base of the wall profile.

   Foot - the raised supports at the base of the container

   Simple Foot  - the most basic style of foot is just the extension of the wall profile without interruption to the ground.  The shape and extension of this foot is revealed  primarily through the negative cutout spaces between.
 A variation of this style is a simple foot underneath a bead or bump out at the base of the wall profile.  Similar to an indent below the lip rim, this is a decorative emphasis  of these design components.

   Inset Foot  - the foot emerges from a small distance inside the end of the wall profile.  An inset foot de-emphasizes itself and tends to visually lift and “float” the container  and lighten its appearance.  This foot can angle or curve further inward, outward or simply vertical.  A foot that angles further inward under the floor will all but disappear  when viewed from normal vantage point. If angled or curved outward the foot reemerges as a design element and can add a decorative flare or posture.

   Flared Foot  - the foot splays outward of the base of the wall profile.

  • This type of foot can be highly decorative and used to emphasize dynamic trunk and branch movement.
  • This style foot can add a sense of stability to a composition where the tree’s apex or overall movement is weighted off center.
              top